UC Observer logo
UCObserver on SoundCloud UCObserver on YouTube UCObserver on Facebook UCObserver on Twitter UCObserver's RSS Feeds
Women pick serviceberries in downtown Toronto as part of a Not Far from the Tree initiative. (Photo: Celeste Ceres)

Canadians are taking advantage of our urban harvest

Look closely in cities across the country, and you’ll find alleyways, backyards and campus lawns brimming with fruit. Much of it used to simply rot, but that’s changing as more people discover the hidden treasures of the urban orchard.

By Jonathan Forani

As Helena Moncrieff plucked serviceberries from a sidewalk tree near the old Honest Ed’s discount store in Toronto, a woman walked by askance. The berries couldn’t possibly be safe to eat. But Moncrieff assured her they were and continued picking, placing the fruit in a dry yogurt container she had brought along. She offered the woman a second container, and she joined in. Soon another person stopped to pluck some berries of their own. “We started talking about recipes, where the food was going,” said Moncrieff, a writer and instructor at Humber College. “It was like being in Honest Ed’s looking for the bargains on the table.”

Moncrieff was taking advantage of an untapped food resource. Though some berries are poisonous, the serviceberries she picked that day are just one example of perfectly healthy fruit that many cities have to offer. Across Canada, there are sidewalks like this one, college campus fields, private backyards and front yards brimming with unused fruit, from grapes and plums, to figs and apples. Planted generations earlier, many of these fruit trees and plants will rot because they are presumed poisonous or because their new owners don’t have the knowledge or resources to maintain them.

A growing number of organizations across Canada — nearly 20 from Victoria to Halifax — are tapping into the urban forest. Many of these groups will harvest fruit for free, giving a portion to the homeowner, a portion to volunteers and a portion to food banks and other local charities. The pickings are plentiful. In Victoria, the Lifecycles Fruit Tree Project brought in over 19,000 kilograms of fruit in 2015. In Toronto last year, a similar group called Not Far from the Tree gathered more than 5,500 kilograms and sent more than a third of it to different agencies across the city.

For Moncrieff, who wrote the book on urban fruit (The Fruitful City: The Enduring Power of the Urban Food Forest, ECW Press, $22.95), the plants don’t just offer unexpected bounty, but also teach us about our history. She calls them “agricultural graffiti marks” that can reveal who was here before us, such as yards full of fig trees exposing an area’s Italian roots.

Their presence provides a sense of connection not unlike what you’d find at a worship service or neighbourhood centre, “except it’s less organized,” says Moncrieff. “You build communities around these trees.”


Readers’ advisory: The discussion below is moderated by The UC Observer and facilitated by Intense Debate (ID), an online commentary system. The Observer reserves the right to edit or reject any comment it deems to be inappropriate. Approved comments may be further edited for length, clarity and accuracy, and published in the print edition of the magazine. Please note: readers do not need to sign up with ID to post their comments on ucobserver.org. We require only your user name and e-mail address. Your comments will be posted from Monday to Friday between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Join the discussion today!

Faith

Attendees at the Parliament of the World's Religions conference enjoy a simple langar lunch prepared by Toronto's Sikh community. (Photo: Will Pearson)

Interfaith conference illuminating, but those who needed it most weren't there

by Will Pearson

Observer editor Will Pearson learned a lot at the Parliament of the World's Religions gathering in Toronto, but wondered about its long-term impact.

Promotional Image

Editorials

Why we've decided to capitalize B for Black

by Jocelyn Bell

It may not be Canadian Press style, but it shows respect and recognizes a shared identity and experience among Black people.

Promotional Image

Video

Meet beloved church cats Mable and Mouse

by Observer Staff

They're a fixture of Kirk United Church Centre in Edmonton.

Promotional Image

Faith

November 2018

The first Black moderator of the United Church faced racism that still resonates today

by Mugoli Samba

Very Rev. Wilbur Howard didn't speak about the discrimination he experienced in the church. Decades later, Black clergy are opening up about what is still a big problem.

Columns

November 2018

Anti-Semitism is why I’ll always be a proud Jewish atheist

by Joshua Ostroff

On the 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht, this Canadian Jew reflects on the ongoing hate that has helped define his identity.

Faith

November 2018

Interfaith conference illuminating, but those who needed it most weren't there

by Will Pearson

Observer editor Will Pearson learned a lot at the Parliament of the World's Religions gathering in Toronto, but wondered about its long-term impact.

Promotional Image