UC Observer logo
UCObserver on SoundCloud UCObserver on YouTube UCObserver on Facebook UCObserver on Twitter UCObserver's RSS Feeds

WATCH LIST: September 2017

By Observer Staff


Victoria and Abdul
DIRECTED BY STEPHEN FREARS,  STARRING JUDI DENCH AND ALI FAZAL
(Working Title Films/BBC Films)


Based on a book of the same name, Victoria and Abdul traces the real-life relationship between Queen Victoria (Judi Dench) and an Indian servant named Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal). When Karim travels from India to London for the Queen’s Golden Jubilee, he forms an unexpected friendship with the aging monarch. Victoria’s inner circle seeks to end their relationship, but their attachment deepens, revealing the dynamics that have shaped their lives. Sept. 22

Vintage Saints and Sinners: 25 Christians Who Transformed My Faith
BY KAREN WRIGHT MARSH
(InterVarsity Press)


Saints are revered by Christians for their piety and spectacular acts. But examined more closely, their stories reveal human trials and failures in pursuit of God. Narrating her own pilgrimage through faith, author Karen Wright Marsh explores the lives of 25 inspiring “saints” — official ones like St. Augustine and St. Francis, as well as other influential Christian writers and thinkers, such as Søren Kierkegaard, Amanda Berry Smith and Dorothy Day. Sept. 12

Bone on Bone
BY BRUCE COCKBURN
(True North Records)


Canadian singer-songwriter Bruce Cockburn returns after a seven-year break with Bone on Bone, his 33rd album. The 11-song record, whose release coincides with Cockburn’s induction into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame, weaves the artist’s contemplative style with political urgency, which he attributes to living in the age of U.S. President Donald Trump. His spiritual side also shines through in tracks like Forty Years in the Wilderness. Sept. 17

Claiming Anishinaabe: Decolonizing the Human Spirit
BY LYNN GEHL
(University of Regina Press)


Lynn Gehl is an Algonquin Anishinaabe-kwe advocate, artist and writer from the Ottawa River Valley. In her second book, she details her lifelong fight, as someone who has been denied her Indigenous status, to reclaim mino-pimadiziwin — the good life. Through discovering her spirit and decolonizing her identity, the author writes, she has become “fully human.” Sept. 23


Readers’ advisory: The discussion below is moderated by The UC Observer and facilitated by Intense Debate (ID), an online commentary system. The Observer reserves the right to edit or reject any comment it deems to be inappropriate. Approved comments may be further edited for length, clarity and accuracy, and published in the print edition of the magazine. Please note: readers do not need to sign up with ID to post their comments on ucobserver.org. We require only your user name and e-mail address. Your comments will be posted from Monday to Friday between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Join the discussion today!

Columns

(Photo: cuatrok77/Flickr via Creative Commons)

Cormorants aren't the devil

by Douglas Hunter

Ontario's proposed new measures amount to a slaughter of an entire native bird species for no scientifically compelling reason, says this writer

Promotional Image

Editorials

The United Church Observer's editor and publisher, Jocelyn Bell. (Photo: Lindsay Palmer)

The new name of 'The Observer' revealed!

by Jocelyn Bell

"United Church" will no longer be on the cover, but our commitment to sharing denominational news and perspectives remains the same

Promotional Image

Video

Meet beloved church cats Mable and Mouse

by Observer Staff

They're a fixture of Kirk United Church Centre in Edmonton.

Promotional Image

Society

February 2019

Marriage problems: Is the ancient tradition worth saving?

by Pieta Woolley

Bitterness and boredom seem to define many mid-life marriages, but we might not have to settle for apathy ever after

Ethics

February 2019

A Yukon artist and a Tlingit trapper create this stunning jewelry

by Amy van den Berg

The fur jewelry in Whitehorse boutique store V. Ægirsdóttir is creating a new possibility for future partnerships with the region's trappers

Columns

February 2019

Why white people need to stop asking, 'where are you from?'

by Mike Sholars

"...For all intents and purposes, Canada is the only home I really recognize or remember. But none of that matters if I look like I don’t belong, and that single question makes that abundantly clear every single time."

Promotional Image